Interested in Asian American Studies or other interdisciplinary study of peoples, cultures, and histories? Take a look at these courses Offered @ RU in all Fall 2015.

Through a variety of genres, including history, literature, film and popular culture, interrogate the fluid identity categories, the dynamic and diverse experiences, cultures, and politics of “Asian American”/ “Asian Pacific American”/ “Asian Pacific Islander American” peoples in the United States.

Eligible for CCRES Minor

Crosslisted with Asian Languages and Cultures 098:262:01

3 M/W1:40P-3:00

PBRR 5117LIV

TBA
Explore and learn about the diverse array of peoples of Asian descent in the Americas, including West, South, Southeast, and East Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Throughout the semester, we will examine, reflect upon, and discuss representations of Asian Americans in literature, history, politics, film, scholarship, current events, and popular culture. 1.5 F1:40-3:00

Asian American CulturalCenter(LIV)

Hwang
TRANSforming Bodies and Identities in American Culture
The American body has been transformed over time physically, socially, culturally, and politically.  Rhetorics of the body are more critical when something is worn or swallowed; however, surveillance of the body often escapes scrutiny when enhancements move away from the body.  The course examines negotiated identities, “covering and passing” bodies through the lens of gender, sexuality, race, ability, socioeconomic class and more. Social media, film, art, music, fashion, and pop culture will be considered to examine sites and spaces of: the surgically embellished, ambiguous, surveilled, bold, queer, trans, roided, androgynous, oppressed, and the subverted American body in all of its transformations and wonder.  Students will look at body fascism, bodies at war; falling bodies (figure skating, gymnastics, high wire and circus acts); smashing bodies (NASCAR); collision sports and injuries; reassembled bodies (prosthetics); aging bodies; cyborgs and various definitions of the “healthy” body through a critical lens. The use and influence of American technology and fantasy will be examined through examples from Barbie dolls, action figures, Marvel comics, Comic Con, Trekkies to C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and J.K. Rowling.  No text is required, but there are weekly article readings and class recommendations of relevant and provocative readings from The New York Times.Eligible for CCRES Minor
3 Th6:10-9:00 

SC 220(CAC)

Schuster

Black Profiles: From Zora Neale Hurston to Eddie Murphy

INDEX NUMBER 04632 |Course number 01:014:317

Thursdays 5 to 8 PM, Beck Hall Rm 253, Livingston Campus.

In this course we will study the inspiring lives and entertaining works of two popular Black artists side by side: the celebrated novelist Zora Neale Hurston and the dynamic actor and comedian Eddie Murphy. Hurston and Murphy both draw upon their talents in dramatic improvisation, humor, and creative expression to comment on American society at large. Through movie screenings and readings, we will explore the rich legacy of stories, characters, and themes in their works. No prior knowledge of the subject matter is required, and there are no prerequisites. The requirements are two in-class exams and a short review of a movie. For more information contact Dr. Anitha Ramachandran at anitha@rci.rutgers.edu.

Politics and Power in Modern Africa

INDEX NUMBER 14930  |  Course number 01:014:212

Mondays and Thursdays 9:15 to 10:35 AM, HSB 206

This course examines social and political changes in 20th-century Africa, with an emphasis on

South Africa since 1950. For more information contact Dr. Muriel Grimmett at

muriel.grimmett@rutgers.edu.

Black Thought: A Philosophical Examination of African-American Oratory

INDEX NUMBER 18157 |Course number 01:014:423

Tuesdays and Thursdays 3:20 to 4:40 PM, Rutgers Cinema 2

This course offers an investigation into the notion of a black philosophy as various philosophical terminologies are explored. Students explore, interpret and evaluate the ideas, thought and rhetoric of great speeches in response to slavery, racism, violence and social inequality throughout America’s history. For more information contact Rev. Timothy Brown at timothy.brown@rutgers.edu.